Skateboard Art / Artist Skateboard Decks - Owity

Posted by Owity L on

Skateboard Art

    Coda, a New York City-based artist and skateboarder who has been in business since 2003, now represents one of the most innovative skateboarding brands in the world. They often produce incredible designs and unpopular skateboards and decks, which cannot be said for many skateboard brands, and they represent the best of both worlds. Many renowned artists have released skateboard art; from Damien Hirst, Yoshitomo Nara, Andy Warhol and more.

     The mixing of different elements that do not belong to a drawing or a design interested me and was something I began to explore. This collection offers relevant and well-planned designs that are thought-provoking and could easily be used as wall decorations. 

Skateboard Art - Damien Hirst

    With spray paint, stencil, paint and pencil, I started to put my own original artwork on my skateboard decks. As I continued to apply my designs to more skateboards and decks, my technique became more and more polished. 

    After discovering my passion for painting and design, my mother bought me an easel and acrylic paint and encouraged me to bring my ideas and designs to the canvas. Whether it's adding stickers to your board, designing a board in Photoshop or spraying paint, skateboard art is a force to be reckoned with. 

    There are some amazing things I've seen on skateboards that I couldn't even fathom on a screen. Skateboarding is really a great form of art, one that encourages creativity and free thinking. 

Sometimes bluntly, sometimes quietly, it affects you, sometimes not, but It's always in the back of your mind. 

What is Skateboard Art?

    Without the presence of artists, athletes, and designers, snowboarding, skateboarding, and surfing would have become strictly regulated, regulated sports, much like the national baseball, soccer, and soccer leagues we see today. Without them, there would be much less attractive things to do, both figuratively and literally. Developing tricks and finding unique spots increases creativity, and this aesthetic plays into the documentation of the skateboard. 

    As with any fine art, however, the most marketable aspect is the fashion and design of the board. If you can show your fan base that you are not only a professional skateboarder, but also an artist, then you should buy your art. 

Skateboard Art - Andy Warhol

    The fee will be a percentage of the board sold, and if you are a popular street performer, royalties will also be beneficial, as the company will promote your line of board designs. S

    Otherwise, expect a fee of $300 to $1,500 per image or less, unless you are new or completely unknown. For example, some brands like Stateroom print contemporary art on skate decks and sell it for $5,000, but only in limited quantities. 

     Stateroom's most notable project is its "Skateboard Art" series of skate-deck designs designed by Jenny Holzer, which sells for a whopping $7,000, which is cheaper than some of Holzer's works, but very expensive. The profits will be used to build skate parks, provide skateboards for Afghan youth and sponsor projects in partnership with Louis Vuitton. The renowned skater Sean Cliver tries to change this by presenting his own skateboard art as well as the works of other artists on 228 pages.

 Skateboard Art - Yoshitomo Nara

    After a local skating shop picked up the text, Cliver found out that his message wasn't really getting through to the public. 

    Hoping to bring some notoriety to the medium of art, Cliver rose and published the book with the help of his friend and fellow skateboarder, the late, great and great grandfather of the modern skateboarding movement, Steve McQueen. 

    He developed a following by selling skateboard T-shirts and hats and exhibiting his art in cafes, shops and galleries. He earned a reputation for his graphic art, which was favoured by his friends and fellow artists such as Steve McQueen. As a skateboarder, he must have developed first as an artist and then as a writer, because he is considered one of the most influential artists of his generation.

How do you paint a skateboard?

Most skateboard decks are covered in screen imaging, some are painted on but not usually. It's a free for all, allow your creative juices to flow. Our favourite artist when it comes to painted Skateboard Art is Andy Blank. Check him out for inspiration! 

Skateboard Art - Andy Blank

    This will increase the value of the artist and give us an idea of what the next art trend is that is gaining popularity in the skate-boarding community. 

    Cheung teaches the queer art scene as a whole, but he also gives queer skaters a unique perspective on the history of skateboarding and its relationship to queer culture. The queer community in Oakland has been granted access to Cheung's art as well as other queer and color artists. 

    Cheung's unity with the press has introduced skateboarders to queer culture, and people from many subcultures in society have been drawn to his work. There is a misconception that skateboarding is a twist in surf culture; if a guy ends up cutting a board and putting wheels on it to surf the road, he wants to ride the waves when there are no waves. 

    Naturally, it eventually developed into a community of its own and began to become popular in the 1970s and 1980s. The ever-growing popularity of culture is great, but as an artist it is difficult not to pay attention. Then as now, people have a real connection to their craft, and it's not just one thing to be good at it ; it is an extension of people and what they like to do. 

 

Cited Sources

How to hang skateboard art Skateboard Art Skatedeck Art

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